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Whether you are opening an international branch of your business, or breaking into international markets, buying translations services can be a difficult task to navigate. Thankfully, when you practice a few proven tips for buying translations, you can save yourself headache, heartbreak, and unnecessary project delays.

Whether you are opening an international branch of your business, or breaking into international markets, buying translations services can be a difficult task to navigate.  Thankfully, when you practice a few proven tips for buying translations, you can save yourself headache, heartbreak, and unnecessary project delays.

Getting translation right the first time around is easy with these three steps for buying translation services.  Use them and you’re sure to wind up with foreign-language professional translations that provide maximum impact.

Step 1: Prep your materials

Take a critical look at your document(s) and ask yourself what sections are vital to your target audience and what sections can be left out.  Chances are you’ll discover that certain portions of your text don’t require translation at all.  Identify them now, hit delete, and save yourself from unnecessary expense.

Then take the time to ensure your original document is spotless in terms of grammar and content, thoroughly proofread and edit to prevent errors from carrying over into another language.

Also keep an eye out for culture-bound clichés, jargon, or slogans that may not seamlessly translate.  Many colloquial phrases lose their meaning when they cross linguistic borders, so it’s best to use plain speak and clear language to ensure that there is no room for misunderstanding.

Step 2: Prep your translator

Provide your translator with additional resources or supporting materials such as a glossary, or company literature.  The more your translator understands your company’s voice and terminology, the better he or she will be able to replicate it in a second language.

Inform your translator of the text’s background and how it will be used.  Specify whether your professional translations should be for-information translations (meaning an accurate, yet unpolished work), or a for-publication translations (fully polished work that flows well, and captures a specific voice and style).  For-information translations are generally cheaper, but make for far more rustic reading.

Then clarify who your target audience is, what the subject matter consists of, and how familiar your readers already are with your topic.  This knowledge will help your translator prepare a foreign-language translation with the greatest possible impact.  Also communicate your purpose in writing and what type of text you need translated (manual, sales letter, website etc.)

Step 3: Define terms up front

Take the time to clarify your expectations upfront with your translator or agency to avoid any unnecessary project delays, expenses, or unpleasantries.  Define your project’s deadline, price, and the final format and length of the finished product.  Specify what target language and regional variation is to be used.  Also create a contingency plan that you can fall back on if the translation is not up to par or is unusable.  Keep in mind that additional editing or amendments to the original text may incur additional costs, so it’s always best to set agreements in writing before embarking on any translation project.

These steps will ensure you get a translation of your documents that is as valuable as the original copy. If you need a professional English into Swedish translator, you are already in the right place.

Tess
Tess
Swedish Translation Services is a company owned by Tess Whitty, a freelance translator (English-Swedish), proofreader, editor, copy writer, localizer and entrepreneur.

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